The ‘voluntary regulation’ of unregulated paralegals moves closer in England and Wales

Although the LETR was able to undertake only a very limited investigation of unregulated legal services, the Report was able to demonstrate that unregulated providers appeared to be delivering a significant proportion of personal legal services and even some work for corporate clients in specialist areas like employment law, all with very little regulation or external assurance of the quality of services. It was also clear that more research into the unregulated sector was required. Consequently we recommended that:

Recommendation 23
‘Consideration should be given by the Legal Services Board and representative bodies to the role of voluntary quality schemes in assuring the standards of independent paralegal providers outside the existing scheme of regulation. The Legal Services Board may wish to consider this issue as part of its work on the reservation and regulation of general legal advice.’

However, it was also apparent that the existing regulators had very little appetite for this. It was of course largely outside the remit of the frontline regulators, and possibly a step too far for an LSB being challenged over alleged mission creep, and dealing with a government that was already considered suspicious of extending legal services regulation any further. Consequently, I was pleased to discover last year that there was a real interest amongst membership bodies in the unregulated sector in taking this agenda forward. Over the past 18 months, the National Association of Licensed Paralegals (NALP), and the Institute of Paralegals (IoP) have been working in consultation with other stakeholders to develop a single voluntary register for the paralegal sector. This has now officially gone live at ppr.org.uk

The Register is intended to operate as a not-for-profit service. Members of participating membership bodies will be passported onto the Professional Paralegal Register (PPR). At present there are three eligible bodies –

  • NALP
  • IoP
  • Institute of Professional Willwriters (IPW)

The rationale is, of course that registration will provide mutual benefits for individual paralegals and consumers. Consumers get some degree of protection and quality assurance. Paralegals will be registered on one of four tiers or levels of membership, based on qualifications and experience. They must also carry PII cover, abide by a code of conduct, and agree to submit to the disciplinary jurisdiction of the PPR which will have powers to sanction members including awards of compensation, return of fees, suspension and removal from the Register. Paralegals, in turn, get the reputational benefit of registered status and the ability to ‘advertise’ their work, including specialisation and contact details to both prospective employers and  consumers through the PPR website .

It will be interesting to see if this approach succeeds. It does assume that registration will provide sufficient visibility and incentives for both consumers and paralegal practitioners to make use of it. This may not be straightforwardly the case; we have fairly limited understanding of how consumers currently access unregulated providers.The numbers of paralegals so far registered is quite small, and the first test will be to see how widespread take-up is. From a research point of view it will also be interesting to get a sense of who is registering and the range of work in which they claim specialisation.

Declaration of interest: the author (Julian Webb) is a Patron of the PPR